Tag Archives: father

Meet me in the moments of tenderness

It’s Friday folks.  Time for another 5 minutes of writing wild and free.  No second-guessing, no back-tracking, or other hyphenated words that stop us from being bold.  Just write.

Today’s word: Tender

Softness and joy

Love and freedom

Living life with your care

Hope and tenderness I receive from you

Eternal giver of life and hope

Tenderness from you

To me

From me

To others

Lord help me to be free to touch others

With the same tenderness I receive

Holding up hands with joy

Receiving

Giving

Loving

Joy

Tenderness

You gave your life away

So I could give mine away

And do the same as you

Do for each one that calls you

Father, brother, friend

And for those that don’t know you yet

Be with me now

Let us share this moment of tenderness

Full and free

A life received and given away

Without doubt

Without fear

Without shame

Meet me in the moments of tenderness

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Monday Morning Meditations

I am trying something new here.  I am giving myself a one-word prompt and will just write until I am done writing.  Sort of like the Gypsy Mama’s 5 minute friday, except I will place no time limit on myself.  But, I will not try to think to hard about what to say and will just write.

Honey

Sweet.

Good for me.

At least, not as bad as sugar.

God thinks it’s great enough to say “A land flowing with milk AND honey.”

Honey is part of the promised land.

Sweet. Good for me.  Fulfilling a promise given a long time ago.

Golden.

Pure.

Sweet.

Like God.

Only God is better.

Honey.

Pure love given to me as a promise of plenty and peace.

Sweet.

Honey.

Golden and pure like the sunrise in the East.  Bringing promises of peace and plenty.

Sweet.

Jesus’ love for me that lead to a final sacrifice.

Undeserved by me.

Sweet.

Being with the Father IS the promised land.

Honey.

Pure and sweet.  Golden like the streets of Heaven (so I hear).

A promise to be with the father forever.

Honey from the promised land of peace and plenty.

May I rest in your Glory today Father.

May I feast on your honey.  Sweet. Pure. Golden. Delicious.

Sweet.

Honey.

Thoughts and Feelings

The children used to run rampant through out the grand, old
mansion that they call home. Wild and free they would pursue
whatever looked good to them at the moment. Furniture was
repeatedly knocked over, glass broken, drapes climbed, flower beds
ruined. The Caregiver was beside herself trying to reign the
chaos in. There were so many of them. Often she would
find them with lying on the floor with manic looks of glee on their
face, totally spent from what they considered grand and glorious
adventures. Or, they would refuse to go to bed and find new
ways to bring terror to the Caregivers heart. She knew
something needed to be done, but had not a clue as to what to do
with these unruly children. Sometimes she wished that they
would just grow up and go away forever. But, not really.
She loved them all dearly. After one particularly exhausting
day, the Caregiver decided to call a Friend. She was
desperate, she told him, and really needed his help. In the
blink of an eye, the Friend was at the door of the mansion.
He took the poor, bedraggled Caregiver into her room and
asked her what was the matter. The Caregiver poured out
her heart to her Friend. Tears flowed freely as she went over
how the children behaved and how she was worn out trying to keep
track of them day after day. She was concerned that they
would hurt themselves, or ruin the mansion making it uninhabitable,
and then what would she do? With an expression that radiated
Love, the Friend gently explained that she needed help from the
only person that could make these children behave, their Father.
The Friend said he would give the Father a call. No sooner
had the Friend called the Father than he appeared in the foyer.
He took one look at the place and called out one word,
“Children!”. The constant noise of chaos and destruction
suddenly ceased and all was eerily quiet. Then with a rush
all of the children from every corner of the property came rushing
in to the foyer. Oh, what a mess they were. Some were
covered from head-to-toe in dirt with sticks and leaves in their
hair. Some had been in the kitchen and were covered in flour
and other foodstuffs. A few looked quiet and sullen, or
afraid, these children had barely budged from their rooms.
The Father took one look at his children and very quietly
said, “Come with me.” One-by-one he took them into their
rooms, talked with them, salved their wounds, gave them a bath, and
fed them. Then he put them all to bed. It had been a
long time since all of the children had slept soundly through the
night, but the Father’s presence calmed and soothed them into a
peaceful slumber. The Father then came to the Caregiver. He
could see in her eyes the years of weariness and desperation.
So, he drew her a nice hot bath, brought her a nice supper,
and gently helped her into bed. The Friend kept watch all
night long as everyone slept. The next morning, everyone gathered
together in the kitchen. As breakfast was made the Father,
with a stern, but gentle expression, explained that things would be
different from now on. The children had been neglecting their
duties for too long, and their behavior was unacceptable.
Starting today, the house would be cleaned and put back in
order. No more running rampant. No more destruction.
No more gleeful chaos. This day, their Father
explained, was the beginning of a new way of life.
After a hearty breakfast, the children set off to do their
work. The Caregiver was surprised to find that some of the
wilder children actually looked relieved. Apparently, all
that they needed was their Father. At the end of the day, the
children looked exhausted, but happy. They had their supper
and went straight to bed to prepare for another day’s work the next
day. The children began to fall into a peaceful pattern of
work, and when the work of restoring of the mansion had slowed
down, play. Nowadays, the children gather in the parlor after
supper. Some sit and snooze by the fire, some read a good
book, other’s chat about the day’s events and how they felt about
them. The Father had taught the Caregiver how to manage so
many children at once. They all had their special needs and
their special jobs. Now the Caregiver, is able to fully use
her gifts to coordinate the efforts of the children to maintain
their home. She even joins in their play every once in a
while.

Do your
feelings run rampant like unruly
children?